The Top Mitsubishi Galant VR-4 Resource

Join the best E39A 1991-1992 Mitsubishi Galant VR-4 community and document your GVR4 journey.

  • Software Upgraded - Reset Your Password to Login
    In order to log in after the forum software change, you need to reset your password. If you don't have access to the email address you used to register your GVR4.org account, you won't be able to reset your password. In that case, follow the instructions here to regain access to the forum.

Extremely high fuel pressure

Quoting Barnes:
I like the suggestions, but please don't use a bucket. If you want to do the test, run the hose into a gas can.

why not use a bucket? I would use a gas can anyways but I'm just curious as to why you went out of your way to tell me that? So it doesn't spill or potentially start a fire? Save the environment? Or just out of good habit?
 

prove_it

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 3, 2008
Messages
4,201
Location
Sioux Falls, SD
All of the above
 

Barnes

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Messages
6,249
Location
Richland, WA
Pretty much what Proveit said, but mainly for safety. We (people in general) get really casual around gasoline when we shouldn't be. By emptying it into a gas can, or back into the gas tank fill hole (great idea BTW), you reduce your risk of starting a fire and/or an explosion.
 

prove_it

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 3, 2008
Messages
4,201
Location
Sioux Falls, SD
Remember, fuel vapor is flammable and explosive. Liquid is harder to lite
 

mikus

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 11, 2007
Messages
2,763
Location
Aurora IL
+ a billion, I've a close friend still walking with a cane and can't remember sh*t after a near-death fire fluke accident. He knew his sh*t too, better than most, 10x better than me. Just got careless.
 

belize1334

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2003
Messages
3,316
Location
Bozeman, MT
If you're actually at 120psi at idle your injectors should be pushing double the amount of fuel that they're intended to (flow ~ sqrt of pressure ratio). I'm not certain but I'm pretty sure that is below the minimum afr for gasoline to ignite. Also, I'd think that you'd have fuel squirting out of burst hoses at that pressure. I strongly suspect a faulty gauge.
 

desant78

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
732
Location
Clarksboro, NJ
Quoting Barnes:
I like the suggestions, but please don't use a bucket. If you want to do the test, run the hose into a gas can.



^ I didn't want to spell it out for the guy, he has to figure out some stuff himself, right /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/rofl.gif? If this was me, I wouldn't dump fuel out into a huge space. I'd just get a cheap line from autozone and run it back into a gas container. But still, this is a valid point, and OP I completely agree especially with crap-old wiring, i've made stuff arc a few times. IF i was dumping fuel when that random arc happens, bad news bears. Guess I should be careful what I post before I kill someone lol

both ways good luck OP!
 

curtis

Well-known member
Joined
May 4, 2003
Messages
11,892
Location
Clarksville TN
Just something to think about...... click me We are all guilty of not discharging static electricity before pumping gas. I saw an aircraft dump fuel overboard when a transfer vaule stuck and vapor mist got caught in the rotor wash at flight idle and about 20 seconds later we had a flash fire about 150 ft long 25 ft high and about 20 feet thick. My crewchief that worked for me had just beat feet and cleared the wall of flame by about 20 ft when it howled at him.


Something else not mentioned is the length of the fittings.... you could be blocking the return if the fittings are to far inside.


And one other thing. Never never ever never use brass in a fuel system.
 
Last edited:

okay so heres the update, it is a blocked return line (DUH)!!!!! lol. i guess the fitting i used was to small and that ws the end result. thanks for all the help guys... now im just have to wait for my new ECU to come in the mail and see if i fixed another problem
 

DynastyLCD

Well-known member
Joined
May 12, 2006
Messages
761
Location
Harwinton, CT
OP: glad you got your issue figured out!


Quoting curtis:
Just something to think about...... click me We are all guilty of not discharging static electricity before pumping gas. I saw an aircraft dump fuel overboard when a transfer vaule stuck and vapor mist got caught in the rotor wash at flight idle and about 20 seconds later we had a flash fire about 150 ft long 25 ft high and about 20 feet thick. My crewchief that worked for me had just beat feet and cleared the wall of flame by about 20 ft when it howled at him.


Something else not mentioned is the length of the fittings.... you could be blocking the return if the fittings are to far inside.


And one other thing. Never never ever never use brass in a fuel system.




every time i read one of Curtis' posts like this, i feel like i learned a life lesson /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/rofl.gif
 

slugsgomoo

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 16, 2003
Messages
3,765
Location
Tacoma, WA
Quoting Barnes:
I like the suggestions, but please don't use a bucket. If you want to do the test, run the hose into a gas can.



I didn't think about it because with as cold as it's been and how high the humidity is over here, if I were doing it there's virtually no risk (I know, I know) to using a bucket versus a gas can. I should've probably said "approved fuel rated container" but I like to live dangerously. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif
 

Barnes

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Messages
6,249
Location
Richland, WA
Quoting Wikipedia:

Like other alkanes, gasoline burns in a limited range of its vapor phase and, coupled with its volatility, this makes leaks highly dangerous when sources of ignition are present. Gasoline has a lower explosion limit of 1.4% by volume and an upper explosion limit of 7.6%. If the concentration is below 1.4% the air-gasoline mixture is too lean and will not ignite. If the concentration is above 7.6% the mixture is too rich and also will not ignite. However, gasoline vapor rapidly mixes and spreads with air, making unconstrained gasoline quickly flammable. Many accidents involve gasoline being used to get bonfires going; the gasoline readily vaporizes after being poured and mixes with the surrounding air.




NIOSH

So draining it into a gas can should keep you above the UFL/UEL, and therefore safer.
 
Support Vendors who Support the GVR-4 Community
Boosted Fabrication ECM Tuning ExtremePSI Fuel Injector Clinic Jacks Transmissions JNZ Tuning Kiggly Racing Morrison Fabrications RixRacing RockAuto RTM Racing STM Tuned

Recent Forum Posts

Recent Classifieds Listings

Top