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Connecting AN hose fittings to stainless braided hose

CP

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Aug 30, 2004
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8,938
Location
West Simsbury, CT
I did a bunch of this last weekend while installing an external oil cooler, so I thought I'd post my thoughts.

Cutting the braided hose:

Measure the length you want and mark with a Sharpie. Cover that mark (remember where it is) with a piece of duct tape just long enought to wrap around the hose. You don't want much overlap or you won't be able to slide the hose end around it. I placed the hose in a vise and tightened until it was squeezed a little bit, with about 3/4 of the taped section protruding out the side of the vise jaws.

I used a Dremel with a cutting disc to make as straight a cut as possible through the taped portion of the hose. You have to work your way around the hose and make multiple cuts. Expect to go through some discs. Whatever the inside of the hose is made from is some tough stuff.

Cut any small wire strands away from the newly cut hose end. The tape should be holding the end of the braided hose intact. Give it a few squeezes to make sure it's tight.

Attaching the hose end:

Unscrew the AN hose end so that you have two pieces, a male portion and a female portion.

For lubrication, I spit into the hose, and smear some clear mtn bike grease on the taped part that will be inserted into the fitting.

Slide the fitting over the hose end, turning it as you push it onto the hose. I then place the fitting and hose into a vise to secure it.

Next you'll want to insert the long male-looking piece into the fitting in the vise, and start screwing it into the other fitting. A big adjustable wrench works for me. The threads will draw the fitting into the end of the hose. The fitting may get a little warm, so expect the heat.

When they are securely attached, peel off the excess tape for a clean looking connection and you're done.

I wrapped any section of hose that came into contact with chassis metal with tape to prevent hose deterioration from rubbing.

Do others have any tricks that speed this process along?
 

mr.mitsu

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 28, 2003
Messages
798
Location
canada
What I find works is:

Wrap the tape (duct or electrical) VERY tight around the end you're cutting. Wrap it around a few times (6x) to ensure a snug end. Cut it and when you're done take off ALL the tape. Because it was so tight there should be NO fraying if cut properly.

I've installed a SS line with one layer of electrical tape too...but the above method works WAYYYYY better...very neat!!!

cheers,
chris
 

spooling92vr4

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Jun 7, 2005
Messages
2,511
Location
long island, NY
Quote:
EASIEST way to assemble a LOT of hose. http://www.koultools.com/?ABCDEFGH

I saw it out at sema and purchased a set on the spot (he was out and had to ship them to me). Best hose assembly tool EVER hands down.



+1 after getting stuck a bunch of times by stray strands of wire i went out and got these tools.. those tools are the best invention ever.
 

sleepyvr4

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Dec 25, 2003
Messages
2,359
Location
Key West
I witnessed CP do this process this weekend. He literally flew through cutting and plugging the lines and fittings. It took the same time for me to make 2 oil cooler mounting brackets as it did for him to cut (and measure) 8 line ends & insert fittings.
 
Last edited:

CP

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Aug 30, 2004
Messages
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Location
West Simsbury, CT
There are a few different brands that all these places sell. I got them all from Summit. Maybe the fittings they sell are just easier to work with /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/dunno.gif

And stop calling me "CP" for the love of christ! I've got a name, so please do wear it out /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/banghead.gif
 

Polish

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NE, IN
/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/rofl.gif @ CP.








Just kidding Cy. I have some hoses to do soon, I'll try out your method. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cool.gif
 

CP

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Aug 30, 2004
Messages
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Location
West Simsbury, CT
Feel free to PM me if you run into problems at any time during the process. I may have a few extra fittings left over if you're looking for -8 hose ends. I actually got the Mocal oil cooler and thermostat from RPWholesale.
 

Cy,
My methodology matched yours almost exactly. I had never worked with these materials before and had only one joint that I needed to re-cut. The Dremel with the fiberglass reinforced cutting wheels work well, and you can use the abrasive face to trim off uncooperative wire strands. Twisting the hose as it is inserted into the fitting is the key step. I used WD40 as a lubricant instead of drooling on the ends though.
Mike R.
 

sleepyvr4

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Joined
Dec 25, 2003
Messages
2,359
Location
Key West
Quote:
And stop calling me "CP" for the love of christ!



idunno mane. I googled "cp" under images and got this:



which bears significant resemblance to this:

img.php


/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/rofl.gif @ CP
 

jepherz

Staff member
Joined
Aug 8, 2004
Messages
7,878
Location
KC, Missouri
Not sure if anyone cares, but here's a comparison between an aeromotive fitting vs. an Earl's fitting. The aq's go on the hose way easier, but I feel more comfortable with the Earl's ever since I had an AQ fitting bite completely through the rubber part of the hose....



IMO, once again IMO, those cool tools aren't necessary. I wrap the hose in fiberglass tape, cut with a cut off wheel on an angle grinder, and never have a problem actually inserting the hose into the hose-end.

Sorry to thread jack, but I am on my second fitting on my oil cooler setup. Both fittings have leaked from what looks like the actual mating point between the male and female end of the fitting. Anybody have any idea what type of torque you are supposed to attached them with?
 

CP

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Aug 30, 2004
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Location
West Simsbury, CT
Thanks for the reply Jeff. Like I said, I think the fittings vary slightly depending on who they come from (mine are from Summit).

One thing to add: the cooler housing to AN fittings sold by MachV don't fit correctly, at least not in the filter housing I've got. The "Metric to -8AN Adapter for External Oil Cooler" fittings that they sell are too small when turned into the housing fittings for my application. The threads barely bite, and strip very easily. The washers they sell with the rubber on the inside are a good idea, but mine needed some help from JB Quick.

The cooler got very hot (understandably) when the car heated up and the inline oil thermostat opened, and required an extra quart of oil.
 

lunchbox

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Joined
May 29, 2005
Messages
1,140
Location
Mil-walk-it-out, WI
A couple things. I wouldnt leave tape wrapped around the hose. AN fittings are not really designed for that sort of thing. My friend did that with some fittings he put together and I grabbed a hose and pulled it out of the fitting fairly easily by hand. The hose was seated deep enough into the fitting, but the tape let it pull off easily.

I use oil to lubricate the hose before I stick it into the fitting. Earls I think sells a special lube, but oil works for me.

Jegs fittings were the easiest "cheap" fittings for me to assemble. Easier than Summit ones.

Do NOT wrap hoses with electrical tape or duct tape when cutting. It deforms when hot. Use masking tape or fiberglass strapping tape as it does not defore when cutting due to the heat.

My favorite thing to cut AN line with is an air powered cutoff wheel with a thin disk. A sawzall with a thin, fine toothed blade works well, as does a chisel and a piece of aluminum as a backing plate. Wear face sheild and safety glasses for sure!
 

jepherz

Staff member
Joined
Aug 8, 2004
Messages
7,878
Location
KC, Missouri
Cy, you can buy the correct fittings (Not sure how they sell ones that don't fit) from Summit for like $7 each. I can get you a part number, but I found it through searching on here; I think Iceman made the find/post.
 

iceman69510

Turn Right Racing
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Mar 5, 2001
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10,971
Location
Michigan
As Jeff pointed out, Earl's uses a "nipple and cutter" fitting, which is harder to assemble but actually knifes into the middle of the hose. I prefer that for fuel lines as it seems more secure because you have compression on two different surfaces.

I lube things with silicone spray before assembly. I use that also for Pushlock type hose assembly. Those are almost harder than AN fittings.

I think the Summit guy told me Russell makes their AN stuff. I use Earl's almost exclusively if given the choice, but have used Aeroquip and a few Goodridge fitting as well when expedient.
 
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