fivestardsm
("Savior of the damned and dis-owned")
11/11/09 08:39 PM
Electrical plug repair

I had this in the Technical post a while back, I just figured Id move it here to keep it.

Just for fun, You can watch the BETA video I made here!


The tools that you will need to start with are pretty simple. First you will need a few pick tools ....a pair of pliers, and a soldering iron.

You will notice in picture A , that I have a plug clip that is very commonly broken at the wires. These plugs are very simple to fix.

Picture A:



In picture B, you can see a white tab that holds the metal spade in the connector.

Picture B:



In picture C, I have the straight pick tool inserted in to the end of the plug on the connector side.

Picture C:



With the pick tool pressed gently between the tab and the metal spade, I pull on the wire from the back side of the plug. It shouldn't take very much force to release the spade connector. On the plug that I am working on, there is quite a bit of wire to hold on too, but alot of times there is no wire at all and you will need a small pair of needle nose pliers to grab on too the end, or the second pick tool to push the metal spade out from the connector side. As illustrated in picture D.

Picture D:



After you remove the metal spade, you will need to remove the wire out of the metal spade. You will notice that there are 2 metal clasp that wrap the wire at the rubber seal.Use your pick tool to seperate these 2 clasp. Now the next part is where it gets a little more dificult.

You can do 1 of 2 things here. Either break the wire off flush were it is crimped into the spade, or use a very pointed pick tool and try to wedge the crimp apart.
For my demestration, I will not actually be removing the wire in the pictures because I can still use it. I will post some pictures up to follw, but I will give you the instructions I will be guideng you through it with a few of the pictures for the remainder of this short How to.

If you decide to try and seperate the crimp, then the the next step would be too pull the rubber seal off from the old wire and slide it on to the new wire. After that repeat the dis assembly in reverse order. If you decide to break the wire instead of un crimping it, then you will need to use the soldering iron to re-attach the wire to the spade.
Be sure to use a good quality silver solder that you can buy at any local radio shack or similar electronics store. After you have the wire soldered to the spade then slide the rubber stopper back to the end and re-crimp it back on.

Re assemble everything, and you should be all set with a factory looking and very durable repair.

Hope this helps some of you out. I know that htere are a lot of plugs that break like this, and they are all the same style except a few.










Picture E:



Picture F:



**DONOTDELETE**
(Unregistered)
11/19/09 09:53 AM
Re: Electrical plug repair

I like to take the metal bands out of old wiper blades and make de-pinning tools from them. Just cut the band out of the blades, cut them to length, and spend five minutes with a grinder to get them to whatever shape. Project Car Magazine had a short tutorial in one of their old issues.


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